Coalisland Weaving Factory Museum

EUROPEAN HERITAGE OPEN DAYS, 2019

In association with the Coalisland & District Development Association and the Craic Theatre.

The Coalisland Weaving Factory Museum was brought back to life in September 2019 when the former factory owner, Jackson Clark, and his machine operator Peter McGrath, travelled 100 years to the twentieth century to tell visitors their story.

“Coalisland Tales…”

“COALISLAND TALES: CRAFTED, GRAFTED, WOVEN AND SPUN.”

In association with the Craic Theatre.

Written by Mark Shields and directed by Oliver Corr. The original performance at the Craic Theatre was postponed due to Covid-19 but the cast got together and recorded this brilliant audio production of the final act.

“The Lock-keeper’s Wife’s Tale”

In association with the Craic Theatre

Written by Mark Shields
Performed by Tracy Timlin
Produced & directed by Oliver Corr, Craic Theatre
Discover the people that lived and worked on the Coalisland Canal as the lock-keeper’s wife reveals some colourful stories from a century ago.

“The Weaver's Tale”

In association with the Craic Theatre

Written and directed by Mark Shields
Performed by Aoibh Johnson
Produced by Oliver Corr, Craic Theatre
We visit the factory floor and hear about the scandal, stories and events from over a century ago when hundreds of people arrived each day to work at Ledlie Clark & Sons weaving factory in Coalisland.

“The Stableboy’s Tale”

In association with the Craic Theatre

Written and directed by Mark Shields
Performed by Declan McGrath
Produced by Oliver Corr, Craic Theatre
Our character, Jonathan Davidson, looks back on memories of his youth as a stableboy and the harrowing consequences of an unfortunate mistake.

“The Coal Miner’s Tale”

In association with the Craic Theatre

Written & directed by Mark Shields
Performed by Frank Fee
Produced by Oliver Corr, Craic Theatre
It was a hard life down the pits and this retired miner leaves us in no doubt of the consequences when everything goes tragically wrong.

"James Brown: A Tyrone Memoir”

In association with the Craic Theatre.

This is a reading of a brief memoir from James Brown 1823-1907 from Donaghmore, Co Tyrone as dictated to his daughter Nora Brown in 1904. His account mentions everything from Famine to breweries and illicit stills, and it offers us a wonderful insight into the day-to-day lives of our ancestors. James Brown’s father had been a weaver, before opening a bakery and later a successful soap and candle making business.  As the family prospered, James also bought a large farm and became a leading figure in the promotion of modern agricultural techniques.  He was active in local government and was appointed a Justice of the Peace in 1879.  James ran the family soap making business until his last days and he died on 17 August 1907 aged 84. The memoir is read by actor Conor Begley

The source material for this podcast comes from the Public Record Office for Northern Ireland (PRONI) and is reproduced with their kind permission.

"Why this project mattered" Part 1

Watch this video featuring the playwright Mark Shields as he talks about the plays he wrote for the Coalisland & East Tyrone – Great Place Scheme project.

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